O’Neill and Keane, Heaven or Hell??

So the seemingly dream team partnership of Martin O’Neill and Roy Keane have been called upon and entrusted to usher in a new era of Irish football, but every Irish man and Irish dog, let alone the rest of the footballing world will be wondering if it will all end in tears or lead to a much needed revival in international fortunes for a country that expects so much?

Whilst the appointment of both raises a lot of scepticism as well as excitement, speaking as a player, a fan and more importantly an Irishman, I can’t see anything but exciting times ahead for the boys in green. In the hotseat, we have Martin O’Neill. A passionate Irishman, a man methodical to detail, a man with a wealth of experience both as a player and as a manager and is revered throughout British football as motivator extraordinaire. Supporting him you have, Roy Keane. Again a passionate Irishman, fiery in demeanour, demanding the highest of standards, highly decorated as a player together with success as manager of Sunderland and globally regarded as one of the best midfielders of his generation. How can we fail to be anything but excited by what could turn out to be John Delaney’s finest moment as FAI chief?

Whilst critics seem to unanimously approve the appointment of O’Neill, they offer a more cautious opinion on the inclusion of Keane to the management team. They see him as an intimidating figure, a viewpoint which is unquestionably backed up by former team mates and managers, a borderline bully if stories of players that previously worked under him are to be believed and a man with such a temperamental character that it could potentially derail any future progress. But, alas, that is the beauty of partnerships, and that’s where O’Neill comes in. The yin to Keane’s yang. A manager that possesses all the traits that will finely counterbalance the sometimes devilish attributes of his assistant. As O’Neill himself stated on appointment, it’s less a case of good cop, bad cop but more a case of bad cop, bad bad cop. Undoubtedly a tongue in cheek remark yet shows a cunning intelligence and understanding of what’s perceived by the public and shows also a quiet confidence in the approach he will utilise in order to reinvigorate Irish football.

We now have a duo in charge with qualities which, when married together, are a potential recipe for unrivalled success. O’Neill is obviously a man’s man, a player’s manager. You only have to read the autobiographies of his former players to prove his influence and likeability. The overriding message coming from his former players is that they wanted to play for him and would run through walls for him. What more can you ask of a manager? Ok, I suppose style of play, organisation and tactical awareness are high on the list of requirements but as far as I’m concerned, O’Neill is going into the job with a blank canvass therefore, unlike the last regime, has ample opportunity to utilise the best players available, in a formation that suits the best players and not the average ones. Keane will be there to ensure standards are high both on the training ground, and in all areas of match preparation. Let’s be honest, if Keane walked away from a World Cup Finals because of shoddy standards then you know the players, under his stewardship, will want for nothing when on international duty. Players will therefore want to come and play for them which is obviously essential for international success, O’Neill for his managerial and motivational abilities and Keane for his aura and legend.

Under the last regime, it appeared harder to get dropped out of a squad then it was to get called into one. Thankfully those days are seemingly behind us, players will once again be chosen on merit. No more language barriers and a manager watching DVDs in Italy instead of relevant live games. No more self imposed player exiles, no more favouritism. Instead, we should be very proud to have appointed an Irish manager who gets the very best out of his players, just ask Robbie Savage and Stan Collymore, and in Keane, we have an Irish footballing legend who, unlike Trapattoni, knows his way around the League of Ireland and knows how it can be improved and utilised, but perhaps more importantly, we have a man who is desperate to change Irish mindset and make the fans as well as the players realise that celebration goes hand in hand with success and anything else offers very little solace. Come on you Boys in Green!!

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Citizenship and the case of Adnan Janusaj

International football is widely regarded as being the pinnacle of a footballer’s career and international success is a direct reflection on the competency of a nation’s footballing association and structure, but is the necessity for success now so great that it is leading these ‘powers of football’ to abuse the ‘grandparent rule’ and lead to a dangerous flirtation with the idea of citizenship which is not only diminishing, but could altogether destroy the honour and principles of national representation?

Let’s look at the case of Irish football and I’m sure the same arguments will resonate with that of England and the increasing debate surrounding Manchester United’s new wonder kid Adnan Janusaj and his potential eligibility to represent England. Irish football in the late 80’s and early 90’s was at it’s peak with an international line-up predominately made up of players with a direct link, either through birth or parenthood, to the nation of Ireland. Obviously there were exceptions to this such as the Houghtons and Aldridges of this world but at that time it was welcomed with open arms as the players recruited with so called ‘suspect Irish roots’, like those mentioned above, were plying their trade at the top level of English football and without question enhanced the team and resulted in resurrecting the Republic’s stature from also-rans to serious contenders. Unfortunately, this manufactured success resulted in very little foresight. There was no lasting legacy, no national youth restructuring and as time progressed and the pressure to continue the success of the Charlton era increased, we found ourselves, as a national team, recruiting players whose only link to Ireland was that they probably at some stage in their adult life drank a pint of Guinness or flew on Aer Lingus. Being a player and a fan, this procedure in national selection is undoubtedly wrong and in my opinion detracts from the dream of representing one’s country, creates resentment and simply highlights the shortcomings, even laziness, of a nation and national association to produce and develop it’s very own talent.

Is it right that we now operate in a system where we have players representing a country throughout the various age groups even up until under 21 level and then switching allegiances to another country where they have a more realistic chance of performing? Is it fair on the genuine Irish players that have their dream of playing for their country snatched away by, what I would describe a “chancer” or in extreme terminology a fraud? The English FA would do well to take note. Likewise, is it acceptable that a player can choose from his own place of birth, his parents nationality, his grandparents nationality and now a seemingly free choice of acquired citizenship to suit his place in the pecking order of any one of several national structures?

The answer in my opinion is a resounding no. International choice should be solely dependent on a player’s country of birth and stretch no further than that of the birth places of either parent. The sad fact is we now have player’s scrolling through family trees in a desperate attempt to associate themselves with a country which offers them the best chance of international selection therefore rubbishing the old footballing chestnut of “it’s always been my dream to play for my country”. International football obviously brings with it lucrative rewards, and the desperation to aspire to this level of football, where one can pit one’s wits against the best players the world has to offer, will always lead players, managers and now seemingly national associations to abuse the system and achieve this regardless of personal pride and principle.

Spectators and sports writers surrounding the English national team are quick to criticise their side’s performance but one thing that they cannot criticise, and to my knowledge never have, is the true nationality of all it’s players. Before the meteoric rise of Joe Hart, the outcry that abounded when Manuel Almunia considered declaring for England was met with a chorus of disapproval from all quarters of English football. There was an overwhelming stance that if England as a nation could not produce a top class keeper then they would pick the best on offer as oppose to recruit a foreigner who merely acquired citizenship. Once again, England are faced with a similar situation involving Adnan Janusaj and it’s not just a media driven pipe dream that has raised debate but in fact, the FA themselves have contacted Manchester United and the player himself in enquiry as to his standpoint. A scenario where the FA have felt it necessary to try and tie down a promising foreign youngster who has shown no previous desire whatsoever to represent England throughout all other age groups is worrying to say the least. Is the English left flank problem so great that it needs solving by a foreigner?

A worrying situation indeed, and what message will this send out to the aspiring ‘genuinely’ English youth of English football–that being the best player in your position in your country is no longer good enough?? Let’s not forget, this is international football, a player shouldn’t be able to just transfer nationality in a similar way to a club player transferring between clubs, and likewise, a national association shouldn’t be able to act like club chairmen and effectively sign players to represent their national team albeit on a five year citizenship waiting list.

People always point to the example of Ryan Giggs and say he was wrong to choose Wales over England for the sake of career fulfilment, but it was a choice that never existed. Ryan Giggs is and always has been a Welshman, and a proud one at that. I’m sure all his caps and everytime he belted out the Welsh national anthem mean more to him now than any success a fraudulent career with England might have brought. I’m not going to criticise any player for taking the opportunity to play international football but in my eyes nationality is dependent on where you’re born and where your parents hail from alone, it should not and cannot be allowed to be manufactured and for me, the buck stops with the selection system.

In Ireland’s case, we have had the likes of Tony Cascarino who prospered during Jack Charlton’s reign only to make a mockery of his Irish heritage in his autobiography, coincidentally and cowardly after he retired. Similarly, Matt Holland, who represented Ireland on numerous occasions and even scored in a World Cup, was seen belting out the English national anthem at a play off game whilst representing Ipswich. This, in a nutshell, highlights my argument. I’m not for one minute calling into question Matt Holland’s performances for Ireland as he was a top player but should he really have been wearing an Irish shirt or was it merely a good second choice, a runner’s-up prize if you will.

Irish football both nationally and internationally has plateaued at best since the world cup in 2002. We, as a nation, now seem to be papering over the cracks in a desperate attempt to claw back past glories. In contrast with England, there appears to be little if any legacy in place, no Irish equivalent of St. Georges Park and no national academy to harness and hold onto and develop our talented youth. The Irish national leagues, rarely, if at all benefit from international success and until the structure is improved and modified from grassroots right through to professional level in the country then it will always be a national academy feeding English clubs when the real beneficiaries should be domestic based.

On the same note, the fact that English football is so infrastructurally advanced makes the FA’s fascination with Adnan Janusaj all the more alarming and unpatriotic. As Jack Wilshere quite rightly stated, “the only people who should play for England are English people….if you live in England for five years, it doesn’t make you English, you should not play”. In an industry plagued by disloyalty, let’s now preserve the prestige of international football and tighten the belt on the requirements necessary for national representation. In the case of Adnan Janusaj, let’s hope, for the future of international football that common sense and patriotism prevail, for in countries,like England, where domestic leagues are well represented by foreign imports who knows where it could lead.

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An Eye-Opening Summer

What a summer! I’ve experienced every emotion from the ecstasy of getting married to the harsh reality of uprooting and starting married life unemployed and in the footballing ‘ratrace’ of finding a new club. It’s certainly not the way I would have planned it but that feeling of elation on saturday, that feeling of being part of a team, giving everything for the cause and picking up three points has made my summer of upheaval seemingly all worthwhile, and now I just want it to continue.

If you told me upon my release from Leyton Orient that I’d have to wait until the end of the summer transfer window to sort out my footballing future then I’d probably have replied “no chance” (even though part of me always considers the worst case scenario). In defence of this mindset, I felt I had just played a significant part (38 Appearances) in what was a successful season, helping Leyton Orient finish 7th in League 1 and missing out on a Wembley appearance by the cruelest of margins in the JPT. In my armoury I have over 200 appearances in League 1 over the past 5 seasons. Factor into this that I’ve won promotion from League 2 and have a major Irish domestic trophy behind me and perhaps you can understand the confidence in my belief that I’d be a decent acquisition for many a club. However, for large parts of the close season, and up to the start of september, it’s been nothing short of a stressful grind.

I departed for honeymoon in June, already in talks with one club, which in all intents and purposes was pretty much a done deal, but if football has taught me anything it’s that until the ink is dry on the contract, nothing is a done deal. They say a day in football is a long time so two weeks might as well be an eternity. I returned from honeymoon after two weeks and the whole picture changed. I found myself dropped like a hot snot by my agent of four years because he left for pastures new as a football league chief executive (cheers for that) and despite the manager of the said club still insisting on “wanting me on board” upon my return, he went and signed someone else in my position the very next day and to top it off, he didn’t even have the common courtesy to call and explain the situation. So, in a nutshell, I found myself clubless and agentless which in the football close season is not a great combo. Unlike other jobs, obtaining a footballing contract isn’t done by simply sending off a CV to prospective employers. The truth is, it’s almost all done through agents who are responsible for touting around the availability of their clients to football managers, and the harsh reality, whether you like them or loathe them, is that a player’s club-move can be largely dependant on an agents relationship with any given manager or club. From this, you can see for yourself that having a well connected agent is a vital ally for a player in order to unearth all potential suitors and therefore obtain the best deal. On the contrary, you can also see how not having one can be a worrying scenario for a player.

As the days ticked into July and then August, the reality of the situation facing me became a daunting one. Being at home, training alone and waiting for the phone to ring is a very lonely and demoralising existence. You dwell on your decisions to turn down offers from lower division sides with the confidence and hope of securing a deal to play at the highest possible level, and you constantly wonder whether you have you made the right choice. As the days tick by, you find yourself wrestling with your mind and your decision to hold out and keep the faith in your belief that the right offer will present itself. It’s a relentless mental torture. You listen to your mates in football talk about starting back for their pre-season and their ensuing season’s at their own clubs with all the usual training ground banter and it really hits you hard. You find yourself limiting contact with those mates as their banter and joviality and questions of concern only add to your anxiety and desperation to find a club which in turn leads to a reclusive way of thinking and an almost self imposed isolation. You click on Sky Sports News almost routinely to check if clubs are signing players and if they’re not, then it fills you with a strange but reassuring hope that the market is slow, however, when you do see the signings being made then your chest can tighten with anxiety as you ponder your next career move. As the days of solitary training progress, your mind becomes overrun with thoughts pondering the eternal question “what shall I do without football?”. I found the stress of the situation well managed by training hard which I found was the only time I was free from thought and where I could sweat my troubles away. I followed a strict training programme to keep myself sane, for want of a better word, and ready for action when the call came if at all. However, the problem with this is you can only train for so long, it’s the time when your alone in situ with your thoughts which are the hardest and weekends particularly, usually on Saturdays at 3pm.

With the new financial restrictions in place resulting in slashed budgets and squad sizes, out of contract players must now compete not only with other unattached players but also the reserve and youth of elite Premier League clubs being offered to lower league clubs whose wages are paid in full by their parent club. From the recipient clubs point of view this arrangement is fantastic with little or no repercussions. They acquire a player, although usually untested in competitive football, for free with no adverse effect on their budget. However, the implications of this on out of contract players like myself is frightening as how are we now supposed to compete with this offer of free labour and still earn a living in an already over competitive market? Unquestionably, it is an unerring situation to find yourself in but just goes to reinforce the present austerity of the footballing industry and the difficulties faced, as well as the sacrifices that must be made, by players all across the country to maintain and sustain a career. The advantageous days of the Bosman ruling are long gone and with the current economic climate, it would appear that football clubs now hold most of the key negotiating trump cards.

With the amount of players now out of work, clubs can be as as ruthless and stingey as they feel fit to a point. If a club wants you on trial first and you fancy signing there, then you better believe it’s a trial your gonna have to do regardless of reputation and experience. In this scenario, which I have unfortunately experienced, a player runs the risk of simply being used by a potential employer as ‘just another training/game body’ so opportunity selection would appear to be a key determinant in either gaining a contract or being mugged off. Unfortunately for out of contract pros in this desperate climate, this is a common tactic used by clubs, and a player looking to acquire a contract is faced with this double edged sword scenario and can only truly realise the outcome by seeing out the trial period or twigging early on in the trial that he’s being used and is wasting his time. All this uncertainty, of course, could be avoided with an honest and sincere conversation between player and manager but unfortunately honesty and sincerity are hard traits to come by in an industry where it’s all too easy to ‘use and abuse’. With this in mind, I’d like to reserve special mention for Greg Abbott’s refreshing honesty in getting me up to Carlisle. No bullshit, no fake promises and no hidden agendas. I’m only sorry I didn’t get to work with him longer as he appears to be one of the good guys in what, at times, can be a cynical industry.

For those fans who still believe that a career in football is an easy existence, they firstly need to realise that there’s more to becoming, and being a footballer than ninety minutes on a saturday. In fact, in an industry where honesty and sincerity are in short supply, I’d go so far as to say that it’s the ninety minutes on a saturday which is the easy part, but also the part that makes putting up with all the shit within football completely worthwhile.To have and sustain a career in football is, without doubt a privilege but, in the lower leagues especially, it’s anything but easy!!

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Loyalty and the “rat race”…

The end of another season has arrived and so the rat race begins trying to find a new club. Being released at the end of a contract is one of those things that every player apart from the lucky few will have to endure at some stage throughout a career. The feelings of anxiety and worry are unavoidable for a player as you enter into a phase of the season where clubs are adjusting budgets and looking to recruit players as best as is possible to fit in with club finances. As a player, you just hope the reputation you’ve built up and the previous seasons performances haven’t gone unnoticed by potential suitors, but it’s a time where the waiting game begins and the phone is a constant companion. Will it ring, if at all and who will ring, if anyone?

It makes you wonder, as a player, about the question of loyalty in football and the realisation that it simply doesn’t exist, but that is simply the reality of the industry in which we ply our trade. You often hear of managers and fans questioning player’s loyalty when players move clubs, citing the usual cliche of ‘money grabber’ but the fact is players are in the game to achieve success, be it to win trophies or promotions, and to earn the best deal financially available. Take the contrasting fortunes of Orient keepers Ryan Alsopp and Lee Butcher and perhaps you’ll understand what I’m getting at.

Ryan was criticised heavily when he departed to Bournemouth earlier in the season for the security of a long term contract and I presume a more lucrative salary. He took the risk of a short term deal at Orient where he was signed as nothing more than a number two, but after getting his opportunity to play, as a result of injury, he went on to have a phenomenal stay between the sticks therefore attracting interest from all that saw him in action. Yes, people will say that Orient gave him an opportunity and he perhaps should have stayed loyal, but he earned his move, risked injury for a fragile short term deal and performed fantastically for the club when called upon so he should have been thanked and wished well. Hypothetically speaking, if he never got the opportunity to perform or if Lee recovered from injury in January to challenge Jamie Jones for the position of goalkeeper then would Ryan’s contract have even been renewed? Probably not, but I guess we’ll never know.

Contrast this to Lee’s situation, who amongst all the lads in the dressing room was undoubtedly a shoe in for player of the year in 2011/2012 before doing his cruciate ligament in March of that year. He was a stand out performer and won us points on his own with his performances which ultimately kept us up but where one has gone onto promotion to the championship, the other has been released on a free. In this instance, I think it’s safe to say that football can be a cruel mistress at times. As a player, you give everything on the football pitch or should do as a minimum requirement anyway. You put your body on the line and play through injury for the love of playing and helping the team, but when it comes down to contracts and loyalty it seems the only thing that matters, especially in the current economic climate, is where the player fits in with the budget, but hey, that’s football.

For me, in a season of more highs than lows culminating in us finishing seventh, I fell one league start short from getting an automatic one year contract extension. So close yet so far. Similarly, players will have fought relegation up and down the country and given everything to avoid the blot of relegation on their CV, only to have the ecstasy of survival soured by their release from their club. Like me, released with nothing more than a thank you and goodbye but that isn’t a criticism, just simply the nature of the industry in which we work.

For me personally, I would like to thank Leyton Orient for a great two years, a truly fantastic club in every sense of the word. As a footballer, you play with a lot of players throughout a career but only a handful you can truly call friends so it’s an added bonus to have met some top guys during my stay that I’ll be sorry to leave behind. I’d like to thank the fans for the support they’ve given me every time I crossed the white line and for recognising my efforts by singing ‘The Sweeney’ theme tune. Without question I will be very sorry to leave it all behind, but again, that as they say, is football. Like every club I’ve played for I take great satisfaction that I’ve left them in the same or better state that when I arrived. I arrived at Brisbane Road with the team seventh in league one and I leave with the team seventh in league one. Let’s hope the club can go one step further in the near future. Thanks for the memories.

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Talent is only half the story…

As the season comes to a close, like every season, youth team players up and down the country will be clamouring for contracts. Some will be lucky enough to secure new deals and their first meaningful professional contract, but for the large majority there will be the harsh reality of disappointment which will see them faced with a level of rejection that can make or break them as footballers. For ninety per cent of footballers, possibly even more, rejection is part and parcel of the industry we aspire to succeed in, but it’s a players ability to respond to this rejection that can define a career. One thing that is certain in football, is that it is a game of opinions and every person has one whether it be good, bad or indifferent. One manager might see a player as surplus to requirements but another might see the same player as his main man and thus transform him from an also ran to a thoroughbred, similarly a player scapegoated by fans at one club might be a fans favourite at another. It really is a ‘funny old game’.

Throughout my youth years, I, like many other players I’m sure, have witnessed players with abundant ability fall off the footballing radar due to reasons away from football, usually centring on poor attitude. In the ultra competitive world of football, and youth team football in particular, there is very little tolerance in dealing with a ‘problem player’ as the competition for contracts is so fierce. As a result, in many youth cases, the offer of a contract isn’t always a question of talent but instead one of hunger and desire, and it is these key attributes above anything else that determine a footballer’s career. Yes, talent is important, but it is these factors of hunger and desire that maximise talent and potential and result in a player either making the grade or falling by the wayside. As renowned American football coach Vince Lombardi wrote, “the only place success comes before work is in the dictionary”, but regarding the youth teamers of today, when everything is handed to them on a plate at a very early age, is this desire to succeed and work hard really there? 

From my experience at Leicester, I was limited to reserve team football which looking back now isn’t really competitive football. It aids in the development of a player sure enough but there comes a point in a player’s career when it serves its purpose and a player stagnates. I never really pushed to go out on loan because I was in the comfiest of comfort zones, earning good money at a fantastic club and training with top players. Unfortunately for me, I realised too late that I was stagnating and perhaps the vain label of being a ‘City’ player meant more to me than actually going out and playing but hindsight is a wonderful thing. Despite not kicking a first team football at Leicester, I had a naivity to think, upon my release, that I’d have no trouble picking up another club. How wrong was I? As the saying goes, it really is a jungle out there and professional football as we all know is a very unforgiving industry.

In the harshest of ways, I learned the harshest of lessons and found myself so dejected in football that I enrolled in university to secure some sort of future for myself. Thankfully, if nothing else, I’ve always had self belief and a hunger to succeed and prove people wrong, and perhaps I needed that kick in the arse to get my career as a footballer back on track, but for many youngsters today is there really that hunger to work hard and succeed, the desire to overcome setbacks or are they instead so used to having things handed to them on a plate that they believe football owes them a living?

Clubs up and down the country are littered with talent from their schoolboy levels right through to youth team standards. The desperation to tie down the most talented kids to contracts results in players being lavished with all the trappings of professional football before they’ve even kicked a competitive ball but is this their fault or are they, in fact, victims of a youth system that has sheltered them too much from the realities of football and life in particular? Is there indeed an argument to suggest that heart, desire and a will to succeed are more essential for success than ability?

I’m fortunate now to play for a club which goes over and beyond to provide everything required for a player to perform. Every detail is catered for our needs, from a fitness coach and masseuse providing input into fitness and recovery, to recovery/protein shakes, energy drinks and gels, all the way down to jelly babies and Jaffa cakes at half time. The examples of jelly babies and Jaffa cakes might seem a very trivial one but from my experiences at non league level, they are now an appreciated luxury and one that is now unfortunately taken for granted around the football league and premier league academies of today. At Leicester, playing in the reserves, we were treated like first teamers. We travelled on the first team coach to games and had every luxury available to us that was available to first teamers. It wasn’t until Micky Adams came in as manager and stopped all that with the attitude of “you’ll only get all the niceties when you deserve it”, and he couldn’t have been more right. At Orient, we want for nothing. We have a kitman that can’t do enough for us and has his job executed to precision, in fact if it wasn’t for him some of us players might forget our boots to play, but jokes aside if that kind of attention to detail and comfort is afforded to a team in League 1 then you can only imagine the level it rises to in the premier league?

Throughout my career I’ve seen loanees and trialists from top and second tier clubs come to wherever it was I was playing and the culture shock for them is quite dramatic. You can see the bewilderment in their eyes in the dressing room as they try to grasp a reason as to why the showers are cold or why you have to wash your own boots? They flit in and out of clubs either on loan or on trial wondering why people tackle them hard in games and even in training, or why the manager shouts at them to track something called a “runner”? They appear to be cocooned in a fairytale football bubble but who is to blame? When playing away from home, we have the luxury of training at some top clubs boasting some of the best academy facilities in the country and just observing the academy car park is enough to make you wish you were eighteen again. It could be said that this level of detachment between divisions exists because modern young players are mollycoddled, especially coming through the ranks at premier league clubs where their every need is catered for. Undoubtedly, some would have trouble wiping their own backside without direction.

For me, I love seeing young players from big clubs going out on loan to lower league teams as I feel it to be an invaluable learning experience for their development. It gives them a new sense of perspective and shows them how lucky they are to have the opportunity to utilise the facilities at a top club. They learn the rough and tumble of lower league football which can help them develop their game and mindset but most importantly it helps break down the arrogance and brashness of youth in the right portion and teaches them a certain humility which can stand to them both as a player and a person. If nothing else, it shows players from top clubs that there is life outside the premier league, an opportunity to make a good living and more importantly an opportunity to re-climb the ladder to success and prove the doubters wrong. Without question, some players will always have that will to succeed and learn either through birth or development but until we learn to re-dangle a carrot to inspire and motivate the majority of  the elite youth of today then perhaps the most talented kids will continue down the road of disillusionment and unfulfillment.

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The end of Midweek Madness..

As we now enter the latter half of march, we say goodbye to midweek fixtures and hello to the seemingly unusual idea of Saturday/Saturday fixtures. I’m sure, amongst players and fans alike, the midweek fixture divides opinion. For me personally, there’s nothing better than playing under lights and having games coming thick and fast. It really can be a long tedious week of training and anticipation in build up to Saturday/Saturday fixtures, so a congested fixture schedule usually reduces the work spent on the training pitch and allows us players to get into a flow.

There’s no truer test to a clubs squad, management and physio team than the crammed dilemma a Saturday/Tuesday/Saturday schedule brings. Injuries need to be managed, players need to be rotated and decisions need to be made to keep the squad fresh and competitive. The Saturday/Tuesday timetable allows a bad result to be quickly erased, a good performance to be built upon or, indeed, can also lead to a bad performance being further exposed. This season, we have had, in all competitions, 23 midweek games resulting in 10 wins, 6 draws and 7 defeats. We have witnessed the crazy month of January which takes the prize of being the most hectic month of my career containing a grand total of 9 games which works out as a game every three days.

Midweek games have undoubtedly provided some of the most memorable moments this season, made all the more special in my view by the glare of the floodlights and shadow of the moon. Maybe that’s being a bit too romantic and I can’t quite explain it, but there’s just something quite unique, almost nostalgic, about tuesday night matches. The highlights of my “midweek season” are witnessing the fantastic Pompey crowd at Fratton Park, the victory over Brentford live on sky which kick started our season, Coxy’s goal up at Walsall and outplaying Sheffield Utd at Bramall Lane and hearing them booed off by their own fans. Unfortunately, highlights walk hand in hand with lowlights and the obvious ones being both legs of the JPT area final against Southend where we let a possible Wembley appearance slip through our fingers and our extra time last gasp defeat against Hull which provided more sting than a ball to the hamstring on a cold January Tuesday night.

Early on in the season, a quick succession of games allows us players to get our eye in so to speak, get up to match sharpness and get our fix of competitive football which we’ve been starved of throughout the summer. Admittedly, that’s all fine and well if you’re playing, but if you’re one of the ones out in the cold for the first few weeks after grinding through a rigorous pre season, then the Saturday/Tuesday fixture list can be a chief tormentor of mood and frustration. The Saturday/Tuesday brings with it a training schedule that pretty much takes care of itself: Saturday-Game, Sunday-Rest and recovery, Monday-Light session/match debriefing and preparation, Tuesday-Game, Wednesday-Recovery day or Golf day depending who you talk to, Thursday-Game debriefing and a near on full session tailored to sat, Friday-Game preparation, and then the cycle starts all over again. This will largely remain unchanged throughout, with a rotation of yoga and swimming pool activities included in the contents of the light session/recovery and maybe a short sided game or three throughout the week depending on league form and manager preference.

Without question in my mind, there’s nothing better than Saturday/Tuesday congestion. Obviously, it’s taxing on the body and gives little recovery time but I’d much rather play three games a week than train and I’m sure many players would agree. Playing in a confident team, like we thankfully are just now, you want the games to come thick and fast. The end to Sat/Tues has perhaps come at the wrong time for us in regards to the form table, but perhaps the right time of the season as I think the fixture schedule was beginning to catch up with us physically, but I suppose the great thing about winning is you simply don’t notice the aches and pains. Winning is, without question, a footballer’s best anti-inflammatory, caffeine and Viagra pill all wrapped up in one. Maybe that’s being a bit too graphic but I’m sure you get what I mean, although it’s probably a picture you don’t want.

Contrary to this, when the boot is on the other foot and you’re on a losing streak, the Sat/Tues fixture list provides very little respite. The congestion of fixtures can provide a sense of fear for players low on confidence and can result in chairmen and club owners around the country getting a very twitchy trigger finger. Losing games in a Sat/Tues sequence is a disease that, if left untreated, will ultimately lead to a terminal outcome for the manager or, more tragically, the team and club. Like ourselves last season, winning games after January was harder than finding a solution to the Olympic Stadium dilemma.

A football pitch provides little shelter from criticism at the best of times, and being short of confidence or form in a Sat/Tues sequence can expose a player to a whole new fear factor. As the saying goes, “winning builds character but losing reveals it”. What I won’t miss about Tuesday games, is Jeff the bus driver taking roundabouts at 70mph, although, to be fair, he does that regardless of what day it is and we’ve never been late to a game so I’ll give him his dues on that. I won’t miss the hours spent on the motorways of England, burning my hand with spilt tea whilst hurdling over Matt Baudry as he sleeps in the aisle. I won’t miss the late nights, getting in after midnight, especially after a defeat when the journey can seem twice as long, (I’m sure the away fans can relate to that one), and I certainly won’t miss the post match ‘farters’ on the bus that the night air seems to target. I could name and shame but I’ll let you come to your own conclusions on who the perpetrators are. So on that bum note, until we meet again next season Sat/Tues, thank you for being kind. Can the last person to leave please switch off the floodlights!!

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The Man holding the torch…

Football, as we all know, is a sport that transcends contentious subjects such as ethnicity and religion, it is universally acknowledged that football, and sport in general, can bring communities together and provide a platform for personal development and success. Like community, it can provide a sense of belonging and build character. Without doubt, football and sport play a key role in communities all across the world and it is the people behind the scenes such as the community officers, community coaches, mentors and welfare officials that do amazing work in ensuring that football clubs reach out to their community and ensure that there’s a relationship and legacy in place for the club to exist and move forward. The term “legend” is banded about all too often in the world of football, seemingly always in relation to services on the football pitch but it stretches much further than that.

Recently, I’ve been fortunate to spend some time chatting and getting to know Leyton Orient’s very own ‘man of the people’ Errol McKellar. I’m sure if he reads this he’ll wince in embarrassment such is his nature, but just listening to his enthusiasm and passion for his community of Hackney and the work he has done and indeed continues to do, justifies the praise.
Errol is the proprietor of Cremer Garage in Hackney, a business he has owned for over 20 years. He is a mainstay in the East and North London communities, servicing not only cars but the community as a whole as both a football coach and official mentor for local youths as well as campaigning tirelessly in raising awareness of Prostate Cancer. I personally got to know Errol, I’m ashamed to say, when he was selected as the official torch bearer representing the London Borough of Hackney for the London 2012 Olympic Games. It was an honour bestowed upon him in recognition of his dedication and determination to help others in the area. I remember him walking across the pitch as we had our pre season photo shoot, dressed all in white in his olympic tracksuit carrying the olympic torch in hands that can only be described as shovels.

Personally and particularly due to his modesty, It’s sad to think that I may never have met Errol or even been aware of his achievements if it wasn’t for the recognition and selection of him by others. Kevin Lisbie, a fellow Hackney native, joked that Errol must have 24 hour a day security on the torch but Errol’s reply was simply “there’s no need, as the community wouldn’t allow anything like that to happen”. First of all, it would be a brave man to confront Errol such as his size but it also shows the level of respect he has built up within the community from both adults and youth alike.

Like many other inner city areas, Hackney is seemingly always associated with negative press such as gun and knife crime and gang association but around these problems is a strong multi ethnic community centred on trying to eradicate these dilemmas and Errol and many others like him have taken a lead role. Errol spoke to me about his role as an official mentor for troubled youths and you couldn’t help but feel inspired. I’m sure many of us feel weighed down by our own problems at the best of times and to hear someone who takes time out to visit young lads at police stations who have made wrong choices and offer them advice and guidance is an eye opening admiration. To act as a father figure to those who, perhaps, haven’t had a male role model in their life is an emotional strain that I can only imagine but Errol simply shrugs his shoulders and says “they’re my boys and if I can help them in any way then I’ll try”.
I spoke with Errol at length about his football coaching and the players he’s dealt with over the years, I’ll mention a few names but you probably won’t recognise them such as Ashley Cole, Ledley King, Sol Campbell, a young David Beckham and our very own Kevin Lisbie. He’s been involved in football for over 30 years and has helped to nurture future England internationals and now is fighting to get Orient’s representation in the Hackney area to a point where they’re a main beneficiary of the borough’s talent.

In 2010, Errol was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer and is now thankfully in remission getting on with his life. To say he was devastated by the news is an understatement and it certainly changed his outlook on life and men’s health in particular. With his wife nagging him to go and see a doctor about his snoring (apologies to Mrs McKellar maybe nagging is the wrong word). Errol went, read a pamphlet about prostate cancer in the waiting room and thought ‘I might aswell get that checked since I’m here’. Within a couple of weeks of the test he was being operated on to have the cancer removed and thankfully it was a success. How something as trivial as snoring can lead to getting a cancer check is one of life’s little mysteries but it undoubtedly saved his life and Errol now uses his experience to campaign avidly in raising awareness for the disease. The facts are 1 in 8 men are affected by prostate cancer and the risk is considerably higher in Afro-Caribbean men, a statistic which Errol was and I’m sure the majority are completely unaware. Undoubtedly shocked by this, Errol now offers discounted rates at his car garage to men who promise to get screened. To date, he has helped 16 men identify the disease and seek treatment and this has fuelled his desire to keep raising awareness and break down stereotypical male ignorance surrounding their health.

I’ve tried my best to keep this piece to the point and I’m sure I’ve only just touched the surface. I could write and write and continue to ‘big up’ a man that doesn’t seek recognition but if it took the Olympic torch procession to make me aware of Errol’s work and achievements then how many others are oblivious to the tireless work that goes on within our little club and community. Errol says his Jamaican parents always emphasised the importance of giving back and being someone who people respected, I think it’s safe to say he’s doing them, Hackney and our club proud.

For those of you who want to put a face to the name and hear him chat about his experiences then simply type the name ‘Errol McKellar’ into YOUTUBE and watch “A story to tell with Annetha Hall”.

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The International Dilemma!!

As another international break has been and gone, the usual debates have arisen regarding omissions, potential legitimate call-ups and those of, what I’d label, the illegitimate kind. Let me explain. Being an Irishman I grew up in the era of “honorary Irishman” Jack Charlton leading the Republic of Ireland to the European Championships in 1988 and successive world cups in 1990 and 1994. Nobody can detract from the influence this had on the increase in popularity of football in Ireland, and victory over England in Stuttgart in 1988 as Christy Moore sang ‘was the highlight of many people’s lives’, but has that success in a golden era fuelled the need for future success so much that its leading Ireland to neglect its national league and call up players minimally associated with the nation. International football is widely regarded as being the pinnacle of a footballer’s career, but is the necessity for success at any cost coupled with the dominant emergence of the ‘grandparent rule’, and even the appointment of foreign coaches at the top level diminishing the honour and principles of national representation?

For the sake of this piece, I will focus on Ireland in particular but the same arguments will resonate, I’m sure, with other countries going down the same path. Irish football in the late 80’s and early 90’s was at it’s peak with an international line-up predominately made up of players with a direct link, either through birth or parenthood, to the nation of Ireland. Obviously there were exceptions to this such as the Houghtons and Aldridges of this world but at that time it was welcomed with open arms as the players recruited with so called ‘suspect Irish roots’, like those mentioned above, were plying their trade at the top level of English football and without question enhanced the team and resulted in resurrecting the Republic’s stature from also-rans to serious contenders. However, as time progressed and the pressure to continue the success of the Charlton era increased, we found ourselves, as a national team, recruiting players whose only link to Ireland was that they probably at some stage in their adult life drank a pint of Guinness or flew on Aer Lingus. Being a player and a fan, this procedure in national selection is undoubtedly wrong and in my opinion detracts from the dream of representing one’s country.

Is it right that we now operate in a system where we have players representing a country throughout the various age groups even up until under 21’s and then switching allegiances to another country where they have a more realistic chance of performing? Is it fair on the genuine Irish players that have their dream of playing for their country snatched away by, what I would describe, a chancer or in extreme terminology a fraud? Likewise, is it acceptable that a player can choose from his own place of birth, his parents nationality and further more his grandparents nationality to suit his place in the pecking order of any one of several national structures?

The answer in my opinion is a resounding no. International choice should be solely dependent on a player’s country of birth and stretch no further than that of the birth places of either parent. The sad fact is we now have player’s scrolling through family trees in a desperate attempt to associate themselves with a country which offers them the best chance of international selection therefore rubbishing the old footballing chestnut of “it’s always been my dream to play for my country”. International football obviously brings with it lucrative rewards, and the desperation to aspire to this level of football, where one can pit one’s wits against the best players the world has to offer, will always lead players to abuse the system and achieve this regardless of personal pride and principle. Spectators and sports writers surrounding the English national team are quick to criticise their sides performance but one thing that they cannot criticise, and to my knowledge never have, is the true nationality of all it’s players. Before the meteoric rise of Joe Hart, the outcry that abounded when Manuel Almunia considered declaring for England was met with a chorus of disapproval from all quarters of English football. There was an overwhelming stance that if England as a nation could not produce a top class keeper then they would pick the best on offer as oppose to recruit a foreigner who merely acquired citizenship. Afterall, this is international football, a player shouldn’t be able to just transfer nationality in a similar way to a club player transferring between clubs.

In regards to Irish selection, we are now engulfed in a scenario of recruiting players that are not only questionably Irish but also questionably of international standard. As an Irishman and a supporter, I would rather support an inept but genuinely Irish team than an inept one with questionable Irish roots. People always point to the example of Ryan Giggs and say he was wrong to choose Wales over England but it was a choice that never existed. Ryan Giggs is and always has been a Welshman, and a proud one at that. I’m sure all his caps and everytime he belted out the Welsh national anthem mean more to him now than any success a fraudulent career with England might have brought. I’m not going to criticise any player for taking the opportunity to play international football but in my eyes nationality is dependent on where you’re born and where your parents hail from alone, it should not and cannot be allowed to be manufactured and for me, the buck stops with the selection system.

In Ireland’s case, we have had the likes of Tony Cascarino who prospered during Jack Charlton’s reign only to make a mockery of his Irish heritage in his autobiography, coincidentally and cowardly after he retired. Similarly, Matt Holland, who represented Ireland on numerous occasions and even scored in a World Cup, was seen belting out the English national anthem at a play off game whilst representing Ipswich. This, in a nutshell, highlights my argument. I’m not for one minute calling into question Matt Holland’s performances for Ireland as he was a top player but should he really have been wearing an Irish shirt or was it merely a good second choice, a runner’s-up prize if you will. There’s a scene in ‘Mike Bassett: England Manager’ where the international teams of both Ireland and England meet at the airport and an English player jokes “here comes the England B team” in reference to the Irish side, but is there a sad truth behind the joke?

Irish football both nationally and internationally has plateaued at best since the world cup in 2002. We, as a nation, now seem to be papering over the cracks in a desperate attempt to claw back past glories. In contrast with England, there appears to be little if any legacy in place, no Irish equivalent of St. Georges Park and no national academy to harness and hold onto our talented youth. The Irish national leagues, rarely, if at all benefit from international success and until the structure is improved and modified from grassroots right through to professional level in the country then it will always be a national academy feeding English clubs when the real beneficiaries should be domestic based.

Irish players go through a footballing journey that inevitably takes them across the water to the realisation of their dream of playing in the English professional league where the footballing ladder can ultimately take you to the Premier League, but what if they didn’t need to leave Ireland to realise their ambition of playing at a top level? That’s a question that poses so many others that it’s futile to elaborate further in this piece but I guarantee all the answers would point to a lack of foresight on the part of our national FA. We, as a nation, are at a crossroads at international level, we can continue down the road of ‘firefighting’ or we can restructure the association and the national league from top to bottom, hiring a Brian Kerr type character, with strong youth development credentials, to oversee its implementation and progression.

With so many Irish clubs continuing to walk the financial tightrope and the dilemma of constantly losing their best youth to the far more advanced English system, then perhaps it’s time Trapattoni’s wages were better spent on ensuring a footballing legacy for future generations. Irish Rugby would appear to have set an interesting template that the FAI could do alot worse than adopting. Is it not feasible to create a Munster and Leinster equivalent in Irish football with strong academy infrastructure and focus on a ten team national super league? It certainly wouldn’t happen over night and perhaps I’m just a dreamer, but wouldn’t it be nice to one day see an Irish club team regularly qualifying for the group stages of the champions league and providing and retaining the homegrown talent that make up the backbone of our national side? Ah, but to dream!

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The Impossible Job??

The Impossible Job…

Refereeing in football must be one of the most thankless jobs in sport. Every decision made simply cannot please everybody. Undoubtedly, they will always be open to criticism, either fairly or unfairly by some quarters, be it from players, managers, spectators or pundits. In the modern game of football, where the blame mentality flourishes, is such focus and criticism on an individual justifiable and indeed, how can it be curtailed?

Referees, believe it or not, are human, therefore are prone to human error just like the rest of us. They have decisions to make in a split second and on one viewing without the luxury of video replays so is there any surprise that mistakes are made? I guess what angers players, managers and fans alike is the lack of consistency amongst refereeing decisions and this is merely a grievance dependent on the individuality and character of the referee. Some referees might see one tackle as a yellow card, some a red card and some might even wave play on and see no foul. It really is an individual decision and revolves around personal interpretation so what possible solutions is there to achieve a desired level of consistency?

Unrealistically and in an ideal world, one referee could referee every game which would unquestionably lead to an improvement in the consistency of decision making but on a serious note and robotic refereeing aside, the fact is referees need help. Football, as we all know, is a results based industry and there is an undoubted relationship between decision making and the determining of results, success and more importantly defining people’s careers. Goal line technology, I think we all agree, is a necessity, but where do we draw the line? Do we want the speed and excitement of association football to be stripped, and instead follow the example set by rugby and introduce a video referee where managers can contest the award of every decision such as throw ins, corners, offsides, goal kicks and free kicks. It is, indeed, a very fine line we must walk when trying to improve the game we all love and not transform it into a stop-start contest like that of American football, but when so much is decided by the blow of a whistle what other viable options are there?  

Perhaps the feasibility of this technology in the football league is far stretched as obvious cost would prove a decisive factor, but in the money dominated world of elite and international football, and the Premiership in particular, there really is no excuse for its continued absence. I, for one, believe there to be a simpler, more cost effective way to achieve an improvement in refereeing consistency. I believe it to be a solution for minimising the bugbears that get players, managers and spectators shaking in frustration. What I’m championing, is the promotion of a more attractive avenue in the recruitment of former players as referees. Now, I’m not for one minute saying that this would solve every failing of the current refereeing system and lead to harmony on the pitch and in the stands, but who better to a referee a game of football than a person that has played at a professional level all his or her life? Being engulfed in the world of football from an early age, like most players are, undeniably trains a players mind, both consciously and unconsciously, to see the things that a non-player might unknowingly overlook.

Players, better than anyone, know the tricks of the trade either through use or experience. Professional footballers see refereeing instances day in and day out in training and, throughout a career, there is a strong probability that a player will see every type of tackle, tussle, foul and dive at least once, therefore it stands to reason they are surely better equipped to differentiate between what is a dive and what is a genuine foul. Likewise, they can quickly categorise a genuine attempt to win the ball and one that purposely endangers safety, who requires immediate on-field attention and who is simply staying down to time waste.

In a specialised industry such as football, why are the participation rates of former footballers in refereeing programmes so low? If you look at the statistics of managers, both past and present, then there is a huge mountain of evidence to suggest that former players make the most competent managers. Obviously, there will always be outstanding exceptions to this such as the Wengers’ and Mourinhos’ , but overall, the vast majority of managers in employment in the football league and Premiership have played the game at some point at a professional level. The reason for this, I presume, is that chairmen and owners of clubs believe the best people to work with and organise a group of footballers is a footballer. This makes sense doesn’t it? On a similar note, the best goalkeeping coaches are usually former goalkeepers, and if you’re going to employ a striker coach then it makes sense to employ someone with an offensive background as oppose to a defensive one, so why, therefore, are we not encouraging and fast tracking former professionals with an inside knowledge of the game to train as referees?

Admittedly, refereeing might not be everyone’s cup of tea and I’m sure there are plenty of arguments for and against, but I’d imagine the strongest opposition from a fans perspective to an ex-professional becoming a referee is the claim that one might have unfair allegiances to certain clubs. However, this could also be said of any current referee so in my opinion is a weak line of reasoning. I believe the true reason for a lack of  participation by former players in the refereeing industry centres around the time it takes to reach a somewhat professional level. From my point of view, I think refereeing would be a great way of staying within the game upon retirement but what puts me off is the fact that I would have to start at the bottom rung of the ladder and referee at a Sunday league level, then work my way up which could take up to four years. Factor in the inconvenience that, whilst still playing, it would be impossible to referee a game on a saturday due to playing commitments and you can see the dilemma in all its glory. You may say that this statement is arrogant on my part to expect a certain special treatment and be fast tracked through the grassroots stages but my argument is, if ex players can jump straight into the rigours of management without the pre requisite of starting at a Sunday league level then why shouldn’t they in the quest to become a referee? After all, who could possibly be better equipped to know the rules of football than that of a former footballer?

The task of a referee is undeniably made harder by media scrutiny. Referees are, along with their assistants, easy targets for the blame culture which exists within the industry of professional football but it is this human error, however frustrating, which adds to the excitement and uncertainty of football. Without it, the game would be somewhat predicable and without controversy. Errors of judgement, both in the performances of players and referees, heighten the excitement of the game we all love, and seeing that every goal can ultimately be traced back to a mistake or error of judgement, regardless how small, then it’s imperative we don’t tinker too much with the formula already in place. Referees, like players and everyone else, have their off days but with the right assistance and guidance from their superiors, they can expectantly limit their involvement in negative sporting headlines and go about their job efficiently and unnoticed like the majority would prefer.

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The Romance of the Cup is back…

THE ROMANCE OF THE CUP IS BACK…

Nothing has made the football headlines more in the last week then cup shocks. First off we had Bradford triumphing over Aston Villa over a two legged semi-final, then Norwich were humbled at home to Luton, QPR lost emphatically to MK Dons and to top it off Oldham produced a tremendous performance live on television to see off a Liverpool side, fifty six places above them on the football league ladder and boasting 10 internationals. What is it about cup competitions that cause lower league teams to raise performance that defies league position or indeed, what is it about cup competitions that cause elite clubs to drop their level of performance and leave many fans scratching their heads at an abject display?

What the Bradford/Villa game showed is that confidence, at any level of sport, is a fragile element and Bradford, quite spectacularly, profited on Villa’s fragility. Any weakness in sport is there to be exposed and capitalised on, whether it be weakness at set pieces as was the case with Aston Villa, or some other performance related defect either physical, tactical or mental. In cup competitions, there is no doubt that complacency is a key mental factor in determining outcome. Complacency is a mindset, and an individual one at that. Regardless of what anybody says to you, motivational or otherwise, a successful, focussed and positive mindset depends on the individual in question. Having too many complacent players in a team is a dangerous dilemma for any manager, even one can be enough to affect the group and influence the result, having more than one can be catastrophic.

Earlier this season, we played Alfreton Town away, the game was shown live on ESPN and the cameras were there for one reason only, to see a cup upset, to see a David triumph over a goliath. Our gaffer warned us time and time again about taking the game lightly and that it was their FA cup final. He warned us to start well because they’d come out of the traps fast and to expect an early onslaught, but despite the warnings, we could and probably should have been looking at an early exit from the competition. Alfreton, to their credit, could easily have been 3-0 up inside twenty minutes, but we survived the early onslaught we were warned about. They did go ahead in the game early on but we thankfully responded well with two goals in the first half to settle us down and take the wind out of their sails. We eventually went on to win 4-2 in a game where they hit the woodwork four times, so to say we were fortunate is an understatement. That, in a nutshell, is cup competition, games are decided by the finest of margins.

There’s no doubt about it that when we visited Alfreton, a few of us thought it would be a walk in the park and maybe there was an air of snobbery in our attitude about us being a league team visiting a non-league team which almost led to our premature exit, but we fortunately produced enough quality to see them off. The Liverpool tie reminded me so much about our own experience. Like ourselves, I’m sure Liverpool players, when turning up at Boundary Park had the same arrogance. I bet a few egos in the Liverpool dressing room were shocked at the standard of the Oldham away dressing room. It’s cold, cramped and the toilets stink at the best of times so I’m sure the players, so used to having the plush surroundings of premier league facilities, were in an “I’m a celebrity get me outta here” mode, particularly the pea-hearts of the group which exist in every group. Combine this mind set with a hungry opposition playing a high tempo closing down game, an early goal which inspired belief and got the crowd sensing blood, and before you know it you find your team’s frailties, both mental and physical, being exposed by an opposition you should, on paper, be steam rolling. This scenario is ultimately where a manager finds out about his player’s character. Who are the ones he can rely on to dig in and fight and who are those that wilt and look to pass the buck and rely on individual magic (ie. a Steven Gerrard) to pull something out of the bag and get them off the hook and back to lovely, cosy Anfield.

In a justification for the higher league teams that were knocked out, I feel making whole sale changes to your team can only distort the function of the group as appeared the case with QPR. While the need for resting players is essential in this day and age, bringing five, six or even more new faces into a starting eleven can be a recipe for underperformance and it’s a risk that managers must juggle. The fact is, players that come into a team after a period out aren’t match sharp. No matter how many caps, or experience a player might have or no matter how many reserve team games one plays, there’s no substitute for the pace and physicality of competitive first team football. In the case of Liverpool, however, they fielded a near full strength side with only a few changes that surely their manager felt could cope or be at the very least helped along by the rest of the team, so, why the defeat?

I guess the answer to that is the reason we all love football, there are simply no guarantees!

In the triumphs of the above mentioned teams, I believe their most potent weapon was their motivation to prove themselves as footballers and stand toe to toe with higher class opposition. As a player, there’s nothing quite like being an underdog and proving the doubters wrong. The Brentfords, the Lutons, the MK Dons and the Oldhams, as with all other lower league football clubs are made up of players that have been told by someone or other at some point in time that they’re simply not good enough to succeed at a club, at a particular level or maybe even in football in general. Perhaps, it is this desire to prove oneself against the best which is worth more than any tactic any manager can apply and maybe strong enough alone to allow a seemingly lesser opponent compete with any athlete regardless of the gulf in ability.

For the last few years sports writers and pundits have questioned the romance of the FA Cup and the priority of the League Cup, even the lower league Johnstone Paint Trophy in club fixture schedules. I for one, and as a player, hope that this year proves beyond doubt that cup competitions are alive and kicking in this country and have reawoken the belief that on any given day, any team can beat any team. After all, there’s nothing quite like a cup upset and a possible day out at Wembley.

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